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The Darwin
The Darwin

On the Origin of Species | Charles Darwin | 1859 Darwin's often infamous work introduced the theory of evolution via natural selection. In the work, Darwin posits that many species shared common ancestors and suggests that new species branched off over time. The image here is Darwin's first known drawing of this branching off idea of evolution conveniently proposed with the two words, "I think..."

The Alice
The Alice

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland | Lewis Carroll | 1865 Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, better known as Lewis Carroll, published a nonsensical story that twisted logic in such an unusual way replete with a cast of wily characters that remains a favorite of adults and children. John Tenniel, the illustrator of the original novel, created the image seen here, as well as other images that brought Carroll's bizarre characters, often based on his childhood friends, to life.

The Shakespeare
The Shakespeare

Romeo & Juliet | William Shakespeare | c. 1591 Shakespeare's classic tale of star-crossed lovers begins with a chorus that sets up the story of young Juliet Capulet in love with Romeo Montague, despite the two lovers being from families that were sworn enemies. Surprisingly, however, the tale borrowed heavily from themes extending as far back to the Ancient Roman poet Ovid's "Pyramus and Thisbe," and "Mariotto and Gianozza" by Masuccio Salernitano published a century before.

The Rorschach
The Rorschach

Rorschach Ink Test | Hermann Rorschach | 1921 Thought to have been created by accident, the Rorschach inkblot test is a tool used by psychologists to identify the inner thoughts or emotions of subject. Around the time of its inception, a German doctor had just published a series of poems inspired by inkblots. Rorschach tested his inkblots and selected 10 from the original 100 based on their diagnostic power. Several of those 10 images appear on this shirt...so what do you see?

The Vitruvian
The Vitruvian

Vitruvian Man | Leonardo da Vinci | c. 1487 Da Vinici was known for his appreciation of both art and science, and the Vitruvian Man captures the quintessential Renaissance man's passion for both. The inspiration for the drawing, however, came from Vitruvius, an ancient Roman architect, who posited that the proportions of architecture were inspired by the ideal proportions of man - which is what da Vinci captures based on Vitruvius' geometric propositions.

Intelligent Design Clothing
Intelligent Design Clothing